dense fudgey chocolate cake desperate for a glass of milk


This rich chocolate cake is the best of both worlds fudge and cake. You can thank a cup of strong coffee for the intense chocolate bitterness and a cup of greek yogurt for creamy tartness. Whispers of melted morsels are tucked away in each bite, melting upon impact. This cake takes about 5-10 minutes to whip up and measuring is made easy with a simple 7 oz. yogurt container as the only tool needed.

Grab the jug of ice cold milk, trust me.


This is so much more than a dense fudgey chocolate cake that is in desperate need of an ice cold glass of milk. For me, this is a learning lesson.

I have spent several years using the same camera lens (18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6). It’s what came with the camera and it was a “good” starter lens.

After much research, I found that the 60mm f/2.8 macro was a game changer for food photography. It was my birthday present last year and I have yet to use it, one year later. Why? Routine, habits, being resistant to change.


Yesterday while out with my friend, who is another food writer, she mentioned loving her 50 mm or the “nifty fifty” lens. It certainly takes great shots and I am always impressed with her work.

I went home debating on whether or not to buy the “nifty fifty”. After more research, I realized that the one I already had (60mm) was truly an excellent lens. With the cropped sensor, it is just about the strength of an 100 mm Marco, which is one of the best.




So today I put away my old lens and braved the newness of the 60 mm macro. I had in my mind that a macro lens was just to focus on sesame seeds on burger buns, so I  never tried to use it.

I was wrong. These chocolate cake photos are crisp, clear and needed little editing.

I also began taking RAW photos (been using JPEG all along). I could not be happier with these photos. Learning something new is equally exciting and nerve-wracking.


This whole lesson reminds me of being grateful for what you have, in all aspects on life. To step out of your comfort zone and stop complaining about how things are or worrying about what is next.

When a lesson tastes this good, you will want to be schooled more often.


Makes one 10-inch round cake

  • One 7-oz container plain, full-fat Greek yogurt (save the container for other ingredients)
  • container canola oil
  • container sugar
  • eggs
  • containers cake flour
  • container cocoa powder (unsweetened)
  • container strong coffee or warm water
  • 1/2 container 60% cacao chocolate chips
  • pinch of salt
  • Powdered sugar, for dusting


  1. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  2. Empty the Greek yogurt container into a large mixing bowl. Now, using the container as your measuring device, add one yogurt container full of sugar and one yogurt container full of canola oil to the bowl. Then, add in two large eggs. Using an stand or hand mixer, beat mixture until smooth.
  3. Now, still using the empty yogurt container to measure, add in two container-fulls of flour and one full container of cocoa powder. Beat on a low speed until lump free, and slowly add in a full container of warm coffee (for intensified chocolate flavor) and a pinch of salt. Mix until smooth. Once smooth, stir in chocolate chips.
  4. Now pour the batter into a 10-inch spring-form pan (sprayed with cooking spray).
  5. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick, when inserted into the middle of the cake, comes out clean. Let cool.
  6. Release the cake from the spring form pan and dust with powdered sugar, if desired. The cake goes well with a dollop of whipped cream or jug of milk.





Author: A Common Connoisseur

Welcome | My name is Maria. Feast your eyes and fill your belly!

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